The Spontaneous Formation of Life

Despite lacking in Earth’s conditions, bacteria have been shown to grow in space. Although, it is still not fully understood how organic life has it’s origins in space, is it theorized that the first organic microorganisms were transmitted to earth by hitchhiking on a comet or via an asteroid that impacted the Earth. Considering that all basic ingredients for life have been created and exist in space, it is possible that early organic microorganisms formed elsewhere in the universe prior to transportation to Earth. The life cycles of stars create the basic ingredients for life, as well as UV light. The two have been shown to ‘effectively promote photochemical processes in interstellar ice that have led to the formation of organic molecules.’ (Meierhenrich et al., 2011) The ‘photochemistry of interstellar ices [could have been incorporated] in cometary dust.’ (Meinert et al., 2012) which could have promoted spontaneous development and spread of early organic microorganisms in space through panspermia resulting in the introduction of early microscopic life on Earth.

 

Works Cited

de la Torre, R. S.-F. (2010). Icarus, 208(2). Survival of lichens and bacteria exposed to outer space conditions – results of the lithopanspermia experiments., 735-748.

Meierhenrich, C. M. (2011). Photochirogenesis: Photochemical models on the absolute asymmetric formation of amino acids in interstellar space. Physics of Life Reviews, 307-330.

Meinert, C. F.-J. (2012). N-(2-Aminoethyl)glycine and Amino Acids from Interstellar Ice Analogues. . ChemPlusChem, 186-191.

Shih, I. (2016, March 24). Bacteria found to thrive better in space than on Earth. Retrieved from phys.org: https://phys.org/news/2016-03-bacteria-space-earth.html

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s